Erosion — The Ultimate Fact Check on a ‘Billions of Years Old’ Earth

We hear it and read it daily: This or that formation is said to have formed 332 million years ago, or 3 billion years ago, or “just” 33 million years ago. Have you ever thought of “fact checking” those claims? I submit that erosion rates provide one of the ultimate fact checks in this regard. Amazingly, this exercise takes no more than some simple arithmetic to demonstrate the impossibility that the earth is multi millions (let alone billions) of years old.

Everybody agrees that the earth is constantly eroding away. Day in and day out, rain and water run-off (the main culprits) constantly wear down the surface of the earth. It’s not just the earth that water erodes: the worst culprit for destroying houses and properties in general is water run-off. A house with a bad roof or with dysfunctional gutters is in a serious danger zone of ‘going to pot,’ but that property is just as at threat if it does not properly drain the surface run-off waters (i.e. keep it out of the field, and out of the basement). Obviously, most of us have only concerned ourselves with our own little properties, not with the earth in general, but the fact is, it’s the same exact processes of erosion that constantly wear down the surface of the earth, and which transport that flux of material, of sediments, and of dirt to the sea and into drainage basins. With this context set, let’s now do some fact checking.

According to one source, the average erosion rate of all of the continents of the world is about .061 millimeters per year.1  Continue reading “Erosion — The Ultimate Fact Check on a ‘Billions of Years Old’ Earth”


  1. Ariel Roth, Origins: Linking Science and Scripture, p. 263, citing J. Ritter, 1964, “Rates of regional denudation in the United States,” Journal of Geophysical Research, 69:3395-3401.