Earth’s Rapidly Decaying Magnetic Field Says the Earth is Young

One of the most powerful evidences for a young earth is its rapidly decaying magnetic field. Measurements taken from 1835 to 1965 reveal that the earth lost a whopping 8% in its magnetic field strength over those 130 years.1) More recent measurements confirm this exponential rate of decrease, at a rate of about 1.5% every 30 years.2) That means if you are 60 years old, in your own lifetime, the earth’s magnetic field decreased in strength by about 3%. Let us be glad the earth is not decreasing in size at such a rate! That is an astounding rate of loss for a planet-wide feature, which the old-earth paradigm requires to be billions of years old. Continue reading “Earth’s Rapidly Decaying Magnetic Field Says the Earth is Young”


  1. [1] “Following Gauss, scientists continued to make global measurements of the field. Four decades ago, Keith McDonald and Robert Gunst (1967, 1968) compiled the results of such measurements from 1835 to 1965. They drew a startling conclusion: during those 130 years, the earth’s magnetic dipole moment had steadily decreased by over 8 percent!” (Humphreys, “Earth’s Magnetic Field,” (CRSQ 47, 2011), 194 

  2. [2] “Over those thirty years [1970 to 2000], about half of the energy that was lost from the dipole was transferred into multipole fields (up to ten pairs of magnetic poles of decreasing energy that point in different directions). However, the bottom line is that the overall energy of the entire field, which includes the energy of the dipole and all multi-pole fields, decreased by at least 1.25%, and perhaps as much as 1.57% (Humphreys, 2002)… If this rate of loss holds steady, then the field will lose half of all its energy in approximately 1500 years.” – (EMM, 17-18 

But How Is Geological Time To Be Reckoned? (Highlights of the Los Alamos Origins Debate: Part IV)

This entry is part 5 of 6 in the series Highlights of the Los Alamos Origins Debate

With the discovery of radioactivity about a century ago, uniformitarian scientists have assumed they have a reliable and quantitative means for measuring absolute time on scales of billions of years. This is because a number of unstable isotopes exist with half-lives in the billions of year range. Confidence in these methods has been very high for several reasons. The nuclear energy levels involved in radioactive decay are so much greater than the electronic energy levels associated with ordinary temperature, pressure, and chemistry that variations in the latter can have negligible effects on the former.

Furthermore, it has been assumed that the laws of nature are time invariant and that the decay rates we measure today have been constant since the beginning of the cosmos Continue reading “But How Is Geological Time To Be Reckoned? (Highlights of the Los Alamos Origins Debate: Part IV)”

Erosion — The Ultimate Fact Check on a ‘Billions of Years Old’ Earth

We hear it and read it daily: This or that formation is said to have formed 332 million years ago, or 3 billion years ago, or “just” 33 million years ago. Have you ever thought of “fact checking” those claims? I submit that erosion rates provide one of the ultimate fact checks in this regard. Amazingly, this exercise takes no more than some simple arithmetic to demonstrate the impossibility that the earth is multi millions (let alone billions) of years old.

Everybody agrees that the earth is constantly eroding away. Day in and day out, rain and water run-off (the main culprits) constantly wear down the surface of the earth. It’s not just the earth that water erodes: the worst culprit for destroying houses and properties in general is water run-off. A house with a bad roof or with dysfunctional gutters is in a serious danger zone of ‘going to pot,’ but that property is just as at threat if it does not properly drain the surface run-off waters (i.e. keep it out of the field, and out of the basement). Obviously, most of us have only concerned ourselves with our own little properties, not with the earth in general, but the fact is, it’s the same exact processes of erosion that constantly wear down the surface of the earth, and which transport that flux of material, of sediments, and of dirt to the sea and into drainage basins. With this context set, let’s now do some fact checking.

According to one source, the average erosion rate of all of the continents of the world is about .061 millimeters per year.1  Continue reading “Erosion — The Ultimate Fact Check on a ‘Billions of Years Old’ Earth”


  1. Ariel Roth, Origins: Linking Science and Scripture, p. 263, citing J. Ritter, 1964, “Rates of regional denudation in the United States,” Journal of Geophysical Research, 69:3395-3401.